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1 June 2003 EFFECTS OF TORNADO DAMAGE ON FOREST BIRD POPULATIONS IN THE ARKANSAS OZARKS
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Abstract

Breeding bird populations were studied in forests recently damaged by tornados and in adjacent undamaged forests in the Ozark National Forest, Arkansas. During 1999 and 2000, surveys were undertaken at 6 points in forest moderately damaged by a tornado in 1996 and at 6 points in nearby undamaged forest. An additional 18 counts, 6 each in undamaged, moderately damaged, and heavily damaged forest, were undertaken in 2000 in an area affected by a 1999 tornado. Typical forest species, such as red-eyed vireo and ovenbird, were significantly less abundant in tornado-damaged forest than in undamaged forests, while edge species, such as indigo bunting and white-eyed vireo, were more abundant in damaged forest than in undamaged forest. Surprisingly, abundances of some species, such as black-and-white warbler, did not differ significantly between damaged and undamaged forests. Species composition differed between heavily damaged forest and moderately damaged or undamaged forest, with a number of species occurring only in the heavily damaged forest type. The congeneric summer tanager and scarlet tanager seemed to show habitat segregation in the study sites, with summer tanagers occurring in tornado-damaged forest and scarlet tanagers occurring in undamaged forest.

John W. Prather and Kimberly G. Smith "EFFECTS OF TORNADO DAMAGE ON FOREST BIRD POPULATIONS IN THE ARKANSAS OZARKS," The Southwestern Naturalist 48(2), 292-297, (1 June 2003). https://doi.org/10.1894/0038-4909(2003)048<0292:EOTDOF>2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 4 April 2002; Published: 1 June 2003
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