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1 December 2007 WOOD THRUSH NESTS IN DENSE UNDERSTORY MAY BE VULNERABLE TO PREDATORS
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Abstract

We used Mayfield logistic regression and an information-theoretic approach to examine habitat characteristics associated with nesting success of Wood Thrushes (Hylocichla mustelina) across an urban to forested gradient in southwestern Pennsylvania in 2003 and 2004. Both nest placement and number of understory stems provided equally plausible models. Mayfield success was 20% higher for nests >3 m above ground level while dense understory was associated with low nest height. Wood Thrush nests in the forest interior averaged 2 m higher with a third less understory than edge nests. Urbanization and distance to the forest edge were not useful predictors of Wood Thrush nest success. The analysis was confounded by low breeding density at the most urbanized sites, but we found moderate success (42%, n = 63) across a fragmented landscape with minimal core forest area. Interior nests in a large contiguous forest were twice as successful (60%, n = 31) compared to edge nests (25%, n = 33) adjacent to a small housing development. We do not know the mechanism underlying increased predation of low understory nest sites that we observed. The ability of Wood Thrushes to see and/or effectively attack a predator in the area may be important for nest defense; changes in the predator community associated with forest edges may also explain differences in nest success. The relationship between nest placement, nest defense, and the predator community needs further study.

Felicity L. Newell and Mary S. Kostalos "WOOD THRUSH NESTS IN DENSE UNDERSTORY MAY BE VULNERABLE TO PREDATORS," The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 119(4), 693-702, (1 December 2007). https://doi.org/10.1676/05-036.1
Received: 28 March 2005; Accepted: 1 January 2007; Published: 1 December 2007
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