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1 March 2013 Vigilance in Black-Necked Cranes: Effects of Predation Vulnerability and Flock Size
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Abstract

We studied Black-necked Cranes (Grus nigricollis), a Globally Vulnerable species and the only alpine breeding cranes in the world, to test whether and how predation vulnerability and flock size affect vigilance. Crane flocks were defined as high predation vulnerability (parents with juveniles) and low predation vulnerability (adults without juveniles). Both predation vulnerability and flock size influenced vigilance of Black-necked Cranes. High predation vulnerability flocks were significantly more vigilant than low predation vulnerability flocks at both the group scan level (t  =  2.379, df  =  66, P  =  0.02) and group scan frequency (t  =  3.208, df  =  66, P  =  0.002). Predation vulnerability and flock size affected vigilance in Black-necked Cranes (ANCOVA: group scan level, flock size: F  =  13.013, P  =  0.001, predation vulnerability: F  =  7.728, P  =  0.007); group scan frequency, flock size: F  =  13.873, P < 0.001, predation vulnerability: F  =  10.882, P  =  0.002).

2013 by the Wilson Ornithological Society
Feng Xu, Ma Ming, Weikang Yang, David Blank, Peng Ding, and Tong Zhang "Vigilance in Black-Necked Cranes: Effects of Predation Vulnerability and Flock Size," The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 125(1), (1 March 2013). https://doi.org/10.1676/12-049.1
Received: 23 March 2012; Accepted: 1 July 2012; Published: 1 March 2013
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