Translator Disclaimer
1 September 2017 Why Are Numbers of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) Declining In the Northeastern United States? The Possible Role of Reduction In Winter Feeding Sites
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Breeding populations of Mallards (Anas platyrhychos) have declined 38% in the northeastern United States over the past 17 years. One reason for this may be the reduction of a unique wintering habitat, artificial feeding sites. I hypothesize that artificial feeding sites improved over-winter survival and pre-breeding body condition of Mallards and were utilized by a sufficiently large proportion of the northeastern Atlantic flyway population to improve the population's average annual survival and/or fecundity, thereby impacting population dynamics. In Massachusetts, the number of artificial sites where people fed Mallards declined 44% since 1999. Other states do not conduct surveys of feeding sites, but Christmas Bird Counts provide additional data on populations of wintering Mallards. A sampling of urban centered count circles from northeastern states reveal a 48% decline in numbers of Mallards between 1993 counts and those in 2013.

H W Heusmann "Why Are Numbers of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) Declining In the Northeastern United States? The Possible Role of Reduction In Winter Feeding Sites," The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 129(3), 528-534, (1 September 2017). https://doi.org/10.1676/16-044.1
Received: 29 March 2016; Accepted: 1 January 2017; Published: 1 September 2017
JOURNAL ARTICLE
7 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top