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1 January 2009 The Historical Dendroarchaeology Of the Hoskins House, Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S.A
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Abstract

The Hoskins House is a two-story, single pen log structure located in Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina. The house is thought to have been built by Joseph Hoskins, who lived in Guilford County from 1778 until his death in 1799. Previous archaeological testing of soil around the house yielded over 1000 artifacts, and the ceramics of these gave a Mean Ceramic Date (MCD) of 1810 as a possible initial year of construction. Our objective was to date the outermost rings on as many logs as were accessible in the Hoskins House to determine the year or range of years when the house was likely built. We compared 37 ring-width measurement series from 28 white oak group logs with a composite reference chronology created from three oak reference chronologies from Virginia. We found that the logs were cut over a 3-year period from 1811 to 1813, lending credence to the initial MCD of 1810. Joseph Hoskins had already passed away in 1799 and the property was deeded to his two sons, Joseph and Ellis. Ellis Hoskins eventually was later deeded sole possession of the property. The two-story log house located at Tannenbaum Historic Park may be more correctly called the “Ellis Hoskins House” rather than the “Joseph Hoskins House.”

Joseph P. Henderson, Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, Saskia L. Van De Gevel, and Justin L. Hart "The Historical Dendroarchaeology Of the Hoskins House, Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina, U.S.A," Tree-Ring Research 65(1), 37-45, (1 January 2009). https://doi.org/10.3959/2007-11.1
Received: 17 July 2007; Accepted: 1 February 2008; Published: 1 January 2009
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