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1 November 2005 Characteristics of sloth bear attacks and human casualties in North Bilaspur Forest Division, Chhattisgarh, India
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Abstract

Sloth bears (Melursus ursinus) are endemic to the Indian subcontinent and frequently come into conflict with humans. In the North Bilaspur Forest Division, a total of 137 attacks (resulting in 11 deaths) occurred between April 1998 and December 2000. Most (54%) incidents took place during the monsoon season. Attacks occurred (45%) early in the morning (0400–0800 hrs) more frequently than at other times; human activities at the time of attack were most frequently defecation (27%); locations of attacks were in kitchen gardens, crop fields, and in adjoining forests. A single bear was involved in a majority (56%) of incidents, but groups of 2 (20%) and 3 (21%) bears were also involved. Attacks were predominantly by a single bear (93%) and rarely by 2 (4%) or 3 bears. In most cases, the attacking bear ran away (55%) or was chased by other people (39%) or livestock. Most victims suffered multiple injuries (52%); single injuries on legs (25%), hand (12%), and head (8%) regions were also recorded.

H. S. Bargali, Naim Akhtar, and N. P. S. Chauhan "Characteristics of sloth bear attacks and human casualties in North Bilaspur Forest Division, Chhattisgarh, India," Ursus 16(2), 263-267, (1 November 2005). https://doi.org/10.2192/1537-6176(2005)016[0263:COSBAA]2.0.CO;2
Received: 26 February 2004; Accepted: 1 May 2005; Published: 1 November 2005
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