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1 September 2015 Aspects of the Breeding Biology of the Australasian Grebe (Tachybaptus novaehollandiae) in Urban Wetlands
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Abstract

Breeding biology in grebes (Podicipedidae) is less understood than that of other waterbirds in Australia. This paper reports on a study of breeding Australasian Grebes (Tachybaptus novaehollandiae) on five urban wetlands in Sydney, New South Wales, from 2001 to 2011. During the 10 years of the study, breeding pairs only used the two main study sites (Lime Kiln Bay Wetland and Moore Reserve Wetland) in 20% and 30% of the breeding seasons, respectively. Two nests and two nest building attempts from one site and one pair during the 2010–2011 breeding season are described, while the development and survival of 23 chicks (n = 5 broods) during the 10 years are also described. The proportion of chicks surviving to adult plumage was 39%. Brood rivalry and parental favoritism were observed. Chicks were capable of some independent behavior (e.g., preening and short dives) within 1 week of hatching; chicks not favored by their parents were forced to accelerate their development.

Matthew Mo and David R. Waterhouse "Aspects of the Breeding Biology of the Australasian Grebe (Tachybaptus novaehollandiae) in Urban Wetlands," Waterbirds 38(3), 296-301, (1 September 2015). https://doi.org/10.1675/063.038.0310
Received: 13 December 2014; Accepted: 5 March 2015; Published: 1 September 2015
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