Translator Disclaimer
1 April 2008 Weed Seed Production as Influenced by Glyphosate Applications at Flowering Across a Weed Complex
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Late-season weed infestations often do not affect yields and are allowed to mature and contribute seed to the soil seedbank, ensuring the future establishment of competitive weed complexes. Effective long-term weed management strategies must incorporate practices to reduce late-season weed seed production by weed complexes. Field studies were conducted to determine the effects of late-season glyphosate applications on seed production of barnyardgrass, Palmer amaranth, pitted morningglory, prickly sida, and sicklepod. Although sequential 0.42-kg ae/ha glyphosate applications initiated when the first weed species in the complex flowered and repeated every 10 d was the most effective treatment and reduced seed production of all species by ≥ 95%, the most practical treatment was a single 0.84-kg/ha glyphosate application at pitted morningglory flowering, suppressing seed production of barnyardgrass, Palmer amaranth, pitted morningglory, prickly sida, and sicklepod by 88, 83, 98, 95, and 99%, respectively. This research demonstrates that annual contributions by a weed complex to the soil seedbank can be significantly and practically reduced by a single late-season glyphosate application.

Nomenclature: Glyphosate, barnyardgrass, Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv. ECHCG, Palmer amaranth, Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats AMAPA, pitted morningglory, Ipomoea lacunosa L. IPOLA, prickly sida, Sida spinosa L. SIDSP, sicklepod, Senna obtusifolia L. CASOB

Eric R. Walker and LAWRENCE R. OLIVER "Weed Seed Production as Influenced by Glyphosate Applications at Flowering Across a Weed Complex," Weed Technology 22(2), 318-325, (1 April 2008). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-07-118.1
Received: 24 July 2007; Accepted: 1 January 2008; Published: 1 April 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top