Translator Disclaimer
1 January 2014 An Alternative to Multiple Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase Inhibitor Applications in No-Till Cotton
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Glyphosate-resistant (GR) Palmer amaranth is a widespread problem in southeastern cotton production areas. Herbicide programs to control this weed in no-till cotton commonly include flumioxazin applied with preplant burndown herbicides approximately 3 wk before planting followed by fomesafen applied PRE and then glufosinate or glyphosate applied POST. Flumioxazin and fomesafen are both protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) inhibitors. Multiple yearly applications of PPO inhibitors in cotton, along with widespread use of PPO inhibitors in rotational crops, raise concerns over possible selection for PPO resistance in Palmer amaranth. An experiment was conducted to determine the potential to substitute diuron for one of the PPO inhibitors in no-till cotton. Palmer amaranth control by diuron and fomesafen applied PRE varied by location, but fomesafen was generally more effective. Control by both herbicides was inadequate when timely rainfall was not received for activation. Palmer amaranth control was more consistent when programs included a preplant residual herbicide. Applied preplant, flumioxazin was more effective than diuron. Programs with diuron preplant followed by fomesafen PRE were as effective as flumioxazin preplant followed by fomesafen only if fomesafen was activated in a timely manner. Programs with flumioxazin preplant followed by diuron PRE were as effective as flumioxazin preplant followed by fomesafen PRE at all locations, regardless of timely activation of the PRE herbicide. As opposed to flumioxazin preplant followed by fomesafen PRE, which exposes Palmer amaranth to two PPO-inhibiting herbicides, one could reduce selection pressure by using flumioxazin preplant followed by diuron PRE without sacrificing Palmer amaranth control or cotton yield.

Nomenclature: Diuron; flumioxazin; fomesafen; glufosinate; glyphosate; Palmer amaranth, Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats.; cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L.

Amaranthus palmeri resistente a glyphosate (GR) es un problema ampliamente diseminado en las áreas de producción de algodón en el sureste de Estados Unidos. Los programas de herbicidas para el control de esta maleza en algodón bajo labranza cero incluyen flumioxazin aplicado con herbicidas para quema total en pre-siembra, aproximadamente 3 semanas antes de la siembra seguido de fomesafen aplicado PRE y después glufosinate o glyphosate aplicados POST. Flumioxazin y fomesafen son ambos inhibidores de protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO). Aplicaciones anuales múltiples de inhibidores PPO en algodón, además del amplio uso de inhibidores PPO en cultivos rotacionales, genera preocupación sobre la posible selección de resistencia a herbicidas inhibidores de PPO en A. palmeri. Se realizó un experimento para determinar el potencial de sustituir diuron por uno de los inhibidores PPO en algodón bajo labranza cero. El control de A. palmeri con diuron y fomesafen aplicados PRE varió según la localidad, pero fomesafen fue generalmente más efectivo. El control brindado por ambos herbicidas fue inadecuado cuando no se recibió lluvia en el momento necesario para su activación. El control de A. palmeri fue más consistente cuando los programas incluyeron un herbicida residual pre-siembra. Al aplicarse pre-siembra, flumioxazin fue más efectivo que diuron. Los programas con diuron pre-siembra seguidos de fomesafen PRE fueron tan efectivos como flumioxazin pre-siembra seguido de fomesafen solamente si fomesafen fue activado en el momento adecuado. Los programas con flumioxazin pre-siembra seguidos de diuron PRE fueron tan efectivos como flumioxazin pre-siembra seguido de fomesafen PRE en todas las localidades, sin importar el moment

Charles W. Cahoon, Alan C. York, David L. Jordan, Wesley J. Everman, and Richard W. Seagroves "An Alternative to Multiple Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase Inhibitor Applications in No-Till Cotton," Weed Technology 28(1), 58-71, (1 January 2014). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-D-13-00078.1
Received: 29 April 2013; Accepted: 1 August 2013; Published: 1 January 2014
JOURNAL ARTICLE
14 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top