Translator Disclaimer
1 June 2015 Response of Bell Pepper and Broccoli to Simulated Drift Rates of 2,4-D and Dicamba
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Field experiments were conducted at Wooster, OH, in 2010 and 2011 to evaluate the effect of simulated drift rates of 2,4-D, dicamba, and 2,4-D plus glyphosate on processing broccoli and bell pepper. Treatments were made in July of each year when bell pepper and broccoli were at the 10- and eight-leaf stage, respectively, and included five 2,4-D rates (1/50, 1/100, 1/150, 1/200, and 1/400 of the recommended field rate of 840 g ae ha−1), five dicamba rates (1/50, 1/100, 1/150, 1/200, and 1/400 of the recommended field rate of 560 g ae ha−1), and three rates of 2,4-D plus glyphosate (1/100, 1/200, and 1/400 of the recommended field rates). Crop injury was recorded at 7 and 28 d after treatment (DAT). Broccoli and bell pepper responded differently to simulated drift rates each year with higher initial injury ratings observed in 2010, and more persistent symptoms in 2011. 2,4-D at the 1/50 rate reduced broccoli yield by approximately 50% in 2010. Simulated drift rates of 2,4-D did not cause broccoli yield reduction in 2011, nor did simulated drift rates of dicamba, or 2,4-D plus glyphosate reduce yield either year. Although simulated drift treatments did not reduce total yield of bell pepper, the timing of fruit maturity was affected. Yield at first harvest was reduced by high simulated drift rates of each herbicide and by the herbicide tank mix. These results indicate that broccoli and bell pepper are sensitive to very low doses of 2,4-D and dicamba that are typical of those encountered in drift events. The impact of actual drift on delayed maturity and total yield of these crops is likely to be costly for the farmer.

Nomenclature: Glyphosate; 2,4-D; dicamba; broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var, botrytis L.); bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

En 2010 y 2011, se realizaron experimentos de campo en Wooster, Ohio, para evaluar el efecto de dosis de deriva simulada de 2,4-D, dicamba, y 2,4-D más glyphosate sobre el brócoli y el pimentón para procesamiento. Los tratamientos se realizaron en Julio de cada año cuando el pimentón y el brócoli estaban en el estado de 10 y 8 hojas, respectivamente, e incluyeron cinco dosis de 2,4-D (1/50, 1/100, 1/150, 1/200, y 1/400 de la dosis de campo recomendada de 840 g ae ha−1), cinco dosis de dicamba (1/50, 1/100, 1/150, 1/200, y 1/400 de la dosis de campo recomendada de 560 g ae ha−1), y de tres dosis de 2,4-D más glyphosate (1/100, 1/200, y 1/400 de las dosis de campo recomendadas). El daño al cultivo fue registrado a 7 y 28 d después del tratamiento (DAT). El brócoli y el pimentón respondieron en forma diferente a las dosis de deriva simulada en cada año con un daño inicial mayor observado en 2010, y síntomas más persistentes en 2011. A la dosis 1/50 el 2,4-D redujo el rendimiento del brócoli en aproximadamente 50% en 2010. Las dosis de deriva simulada de 2,4-D no causaron reducciones en el rendimiento del brócoli en 2011, ni lo hicieron las dosis de deriva simulada de dicamba, o de 2,4-D más glyphosate, en ninguno de los años. Aunque los tratamientos de deriva simulada no redujeron el rendimiento total del pimentón, esos sí afectaron el momento de maduración del fruto. Las dosis más altas de deriva simulada de cada herbicida y de la mezcla de herbicidas redujeron el rendimiento en la primera cosecha. Estos resultados indican que el brócoli y el pimentón son sensibles a dosis muy bajas de 2,4-D y dicamba que son típicas de dosis que se pueden encontrar en eventos de deriva. El impacto de deriva real en el retraso en la madurez y el rendimiento total de estos cultivos probablemente resultará costoso para el productor.

Mohsen Mohseni-Moghadam and Douglas Doohan "Response of Bell Pepper and Broccoli to Simulated Drift Rates of 2,4-D and Dicamba," Weed Technology 29(2), 226-232, (1 June 2015). https://doi.org/10.1614/WT-D-14-00105.1
Received: 25 August 2014; Accepted: 1 December 2014; Published: 1 June 2015
JOURNAL ARTICLE
7 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top