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1 December 2007 THE SCOTOPIC VISUAL SENSITIVITY OF FOUR SPECIES OF TROUT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY
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Abstract

We compared the maximum scotopic visual sensitivity of 4 species of trout from twilight (mesotopic) to fully dark-adapted vision. Scotopic vision is the minimum number of photons to which a fully dark-adapted animal will show a behavioral response. A comparison of visual sensitivity under controlled laboratory conditions showed that brown trout (Salmo trutta) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) had maximum scotopic thresholds (1.1 × 10−4 μmol · m−2s−1, ∼0.005 lux) 2 times lower than rainbow trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss) and Snake River cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri), which did not differ from each other (2.1 × 10−4 μmol · m−2s−1, ∼0.01 lux). A literature review tended to corroborate these results in that brown trout and brook trout were reported to be more active during the night and at twilight than cutthroat trout and rainbow trout. We also measured light intensity within open versus shaded reaches during the day, dusk, and night in 3 Rocky Mountain streams. The scotopic sensitivity of brown trout and brook trout was sufficient to allow foraging during all twilight periods and under average nighttime light intensities in open and shaded reaches, whereas the scotopic sensitivity of rainbow trout and cutthroat trout may restrict their foraging to relatively bright nocturnal conditions (twilight or a moonlit night). Native cutthroat trout restoration efforts may have greater success in open versus shaded stream reaches in the Rocky Mountains and elsewhere.

Russell B. Rader, Timberley Belish, Michael K. Young, and John Rothlisberger "THE SCOTOPIC VISUAL SENSITIVITY OF FOUR SPECIES OF TROUT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY," Western North American Naturalist 67(4), (1 December 2007). https://doi.org/10.3398/1527-0904(2007)67[524:TSVSOF]2.0.CO;2
Received: 5 October 2006; Accepted: 1 April 2007; Published: 1 December 2007
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