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1 March 2008 Observations on Body Mass of Prairie Dogs in Urban Habitat
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Abstract

The black-tailed prairie dog is an important component of prairie and steppe ecosystems. Currently many prairie dog colonies are fragmented by, or adjacent to, urban development, but little is known about what effects urbanization may have on these animals. I compare body weights and sex ratios of prairie dogs in isolated urban habitat in Denver, Colorado, to published data for black-tailed prairie dogs at the same time of year. Prairie dogs in this study had summer weights similar to those reported in the literature, although males apparently gained weight earlier in the year, and observed sex ratios were not significantly different from 1:1. Although prairie dogs in urban areas face numerous threats, my study provides no evidence that urban forage is limited enough to result in decreased body mass or skewed sex ratios of urban prairie dogs.

Seth B. Magle "Observations on Body Mass of Prairie Dogs in Urban Habitat," Western North American Naturalist 68(1), (1 March 2008). https://doi.org/10.3398/1527-0904(2008)68[113:OOBMOP]2.0.CO;2
Received: 1 March 2007; Accepted: 1 August 2007; Published: 1 March 2008
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