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1 December 2008 Diet and Sexual Dimorphism of the Desert Iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, from Sonora, Mexico
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Abstract

We examined the diet and sexual dimorphism of the desert iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, from Sonora, Mexico. The diet consisted primarily of vegetation, with insect material contributing little to the overall volume of the diet. Plant matter was restricted to leaves and seeds. Animal prey consisted mostly of ants, termites, and beetles. Males and females did not differ significantly in snout–vent length, head length, or head width. These results confirm that in general D. dorsalis is herbivorous and not sexually dimorphic through much of its range.

Christopher J. Dibble, Geoffrey R. Smith, and Julio A. Lemos-Espinal "Diet and Sexual Dimorphism of the Desert Iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, from Sonora, Mexico," Western North American Naturalist 68(4), 521-523, (1 December 2008). https://doi.org/10.3398/1527-0904-68.4.521
Received: 10 August 2007; Accepted: 1 March 2008; Published: 1 December 2008
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