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1 July 2010 Efficacy of Using Passive Integrated Transponder Technology to Track Individual Shorthead Sculpins
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Abstract

We evaluated the feasibility of using passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags to mark and track individual shorthead sculpins (Coitus confusus). We implanted PIT tags in 80 shorthead sculpins in 2 size categories (60–80 mm and 81-106 mm total length) and in 1 of 2 locations (subcutaneous along the spinous dorsal fin or in the body cavity). We evaluated tag retention, sculpin survival, and net-avoidance behavior for 29 days. We observed no mortality directly attributable to PIT-tag injection at either tagging location. We observed a 38.8% loss rate of dorsal tags and a 2.5% loss rate of body-cavity tags. No change in net-avoidance behavior was observed. We released 97 PIT-tagged sculpins into an artificial stream and monitored them with 3 stationary and 1 portable antenna. Sixty sculpins were detected at least once, and 18 sculpins were detected multiple times with the portable antenna. These results indicate that PIT-tagging within the body cavity is a feasible method for marking and tracking individual shorthead sculpins.

© 2010
Donald W. Zaroban and Steven M. Anglea "Efficacy of Using Passive Integrated Transponder Technology to Track Individual Shorthead Sculpins," Western North American Naturalist 70(2), 218-223, (1 July 2010). https://doi.org/10.3398/064.070.0208
Received: 26 February 2009; Accepted: 1 November 2009; Published: 1 July 2010
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