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1 June 2001 IS PURPLE LOOSESTRIFE (LYTHRUM SALICARIA) AN INVASIVE THREAT TO FRESHWATER WETLANDS? CONFLICTING EVIDENCE FROM SEVERAL ECOLOGICAL METRICS
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Abstract

Conflicting interpretations of the negative impacts of invasive species can result if inconsistent measures are used among studies or sites in defining the dominance of these species relative to the communities they invade. Such conflicts surround the case of Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife), a widespread exotic wetland perennial. We describe here a 1999 study in which we quantified stand characteristics of L. salicaria and associated vegetation in arrays of 30 1-m2 plots in each of five wet meadows in Connecticut, USA. We explored linear and non-linear relationships of above-ground plant biomass, stem density, and indices of species richness, diversity, and composition to gradients of L. salicaria dominance, including stem density, percent cover, and biomass. Species richness, other diversity metrics, and stem density of other species were not significantly correlated with the density or percent cover of L. salicaria stems. The relative importance values (number of quadrats in which they were found) of co-occurring species in low-density L. salicaria quadrats were significantly correlated with their relative importance in high-density L. salicaria quadrats, indicating that only modest shifts in abundance occurred as L. salicaria increased in density. No individual species were consistently associated with or repelled by the presence of L. salicaria across sites. In contrast to density and diversity features, however, the total biomass of species other than L. salicaria was significantly, negatively correlated with the total biomass of L. salicaria at each site surveyed. Lythrum salicaria in pure, dense stands maintained a greater above-ground standing biomass on invaded sites than uninvaded vegetation of similar physiognomy. This study demonstrates that hypotheses about L. salicaria effects can vary depending upon the ecological metric that is examined. Where one-time, correlative studies are the most feasible option, data taken on a range of metrics—especially biomass—should be taken to inform us about mechanisms by which L. salicaria invades and predominates in wetlands.

Elizabeth J. Farnsworth and Donna R. Ellis "IS PURPLE LOOSESTRIFE (LYTHRUM SALICARIA) AN INVASIVE THREAT TO FRESHWATER WETLANDS? CONFLICTING EVIDENCE FROM SEVERAL ECOLOGICAL METRICS," Wetlands 21(2), (1 June 2001). https://doi.org/10.1672/0277-5212(2001)021[0199:IPLLSA]2.0.CO;2
Received: 18 September 2000; Accepted: 1 February 2001; Published: 1 June 2001
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