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1 December 2003 PLANT COLONIZATION AFTER COMPLETE AND PARTIAL REMOVAL OF DISTURBED SOILS FOR WETLAND RESTORATION OF FORMER AGRICULTURAL FIELDS IN EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK
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Abstract

The Hole-in-the-Donut is a 4000-ha region of former farmlands within Everglades National Park that is dominated by a monoculture of the non-indigenous pest plant Schinus terebinthifolius (Brazilian pepper). Prior to extensive farming in the region, the area consisted of short hydroperiod graminoid wetlands and mesic pine savannah. Rock plowing in preparation of these lands for farming created an artificial soil layer that broke up the limestone substrate, mixed and aerated the native marl soil layer with the broken limestone, and elevated the surface slightly. Farming practices also included the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. The modified soil substrate quickly became dominated by S. terebinthifolius when farming ceased in 1975, despite efforts to control its establishment, such as prescribed fire, herbicide treatment, and mowing. Preliminary evidence indicated that soil removal would prevent re-invasion by S. terebinthifolius and could lead to colonization by native wetlands plants. Two trials, a partial soil removal (PSR) and a compete soil removal (CSR), were performed on a pilot test site beginning in 1989 to determine whether all or only a portion of this modified soil substrate needed to be removed to attain desired results. Removal of rock-plowed surface material lowered elevation in both treatments. While the PSR treatment did show an increase in the number and coverage of hydrophytes for a few years, it did not prohibit re-colonization and re-establishment of a canopy of S. terebinthifolius, and by 1996, the site was again dominated by a monoculture of S. terebinthifolius. By contrast, the CSR treatment showed rapid colonization by hydrophytes and no successful re-colonization by S. terebinthifolius. Lowering elevations by 15 to 45 cm allowed for longer periods of flooding and rapid colonization by hydrophytes on both sites. After the sites were cleared, the average difference in elevation between the two treatment areas was less than a tenth of a meter, but this resulted in a slightly shorter hydroperiod on the PSR site. The small amount of residual rock-plowed soil with high levels of nutrients, along with its slightly shorter hydroperiod on the PSR site, appear to have contributed significantly to the success of S. terebinthifolius in re-colonizing this treatment area.

George H. Dalrymple, Robert F. Doren, Nancy K. O'Hare, Michael R. Norland, and T. V. Armentano "PLANT COLONIZATION AFTER COMPLETE AND PARTIAL REMOVAL OF DISTURBED SOILS FOR WETLAND RESTORATION OF FORMER AGRICULTURAL FIELDS IN EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK," Wetlands 23(4), 1015-1029, (1 December 2003). https://doi.org/10.1672/0277-5212(2003)023[1015:PCACAP]2.0.CO;2
Received: 23 August 2002; Accepted: 1 August 2003; Published: 1 December 2003
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