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1 March 2007 NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS MINERALIZATION IN THREE WETLAND TYPES IN SOUTHEAST ALASKA, USA
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Abstract

To improve our ability to predict how different wetland soils cycle nutrients, it is necessary to gain an understanding of N and P net mineralization rates. Since information on mineralization rates in southeast Alaska is limited, this study will improve our ability to predict how different wetlands affect soil nutrient processing. Net N and P mineralization rates were measured both in situ and via lab incubations to evaluate both actual and potential mineralization rates in three wetland types: bogs; forested wetlands; and riparian wetlands. Soil pH was an important controlling variable for both net N and P mineralization rates and soil phosphorus content significantly influenced net P mineralization rates. In situ net mineralization rates ranged from 410–1,710 µg N kg soil−1 day−1 for N and from 2–27 µg P kg soil−1 day−1 for P after 56 days. Lab incubations revealed mineralization potentials were 2–3 times greater than in situ rates. Net N and P mineralization potentials were greatest in the riparian wetlands and were significantly different from the bogs and forested wetlands. In contrast, the bogs mineralized a greater proportion of the total N and P soil pool (µg nutrient mineralized per gram nutrient) and indicates greater internal nutrient cycling within bogs. These results suggest that different wetland types of southeast Alaska process N and P differently and these wetland types should be evaluated separately in future evaluations of wetland ecosystem function.

Jason B. Fellman and David V. D'Amore "NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS MINERALIZATION IN THREE WETLAND TYPES IN SOUTHEAST ALASKA, USA," Wetlands 27(1), 44-53, (1 March 2007). https://doi.org/10.1672/0277-5212(2007)27[44:NAPMIT]2.0.CO;2
Received: 23 August 2005; Accepted: 1 November 2006; Published: 1 March 2007
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