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1 June 2008 Injury and Illness at the Newport-Bermuda Race 1998– 2006
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Abstract

Objective.—To describe the relative frequency and types of injury and illness in the Newport-Bermuda off-shore yachting race.

Methods.—At the end of each race held in even numbered years from 1998–2006, the captain of each boat was asked to complete a survey detailing any injury or illness among his/her crew.

Results.—There was an overall 87% response rate to the survey. During the study period, 38 injuries and 57 illnesses were reported for an estimated 8105 sailors, yielding rate of injury or illness of 12 per 1000 races per sailor. Most common were injuries to the upper extremity (47%), and lacerations were the most common type of injury (45%). Sea sickness was the most common illness, and the rate of illness and injury increased in races that took place in heavy weather. Radio consultations were used 4 times, and 3 sailors required transport to a hospital.

Conclusions.—The rate of injury and illness was relatively low in the Newport-Bermuda race. Injuries to the upper extremities and lacerations were most common, and sea sickness was the most common illness. The majority of illness and injury can be initially managed onboard.

Andrew T. Nathanson, Edwin G. Fischer, Michael J. Mello, and Janette Baird "Injury and Illness at the Newport-Bermuda Race 1998– 2006," Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 19(2), (1 June 2008). https://doi.org/10.1580/07-WEME-BR-1471.1
Published: 1 June 2008
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