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21 December 2018 Post-release breeding of translocated sharp-tailed grouse and an absence of artificial insemination effects
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Abstract

Context. Translocation has become a widely used method to restore wildlife populations following extirpation. For some species, such as lekking grouse, which breed at traditional mating grounds, reproduction is linked to culturally established geographic locations. Cultural centres are lost upon extirpation, making restoration into otherwise rehabilitated habitats especially challenging. The process by which species with culturally dependent reproduction sometimes become re-established is poorly understood and merits investigation to improve conservation strategies.

© CSIRO 2019
Steven R. Mathews, Peter S. Coates, Jennifer A. Fike, Helena Schneider, Dominik Fischer, Sara J. Oyler-McCance, Michael Lierz, and David J. Delehanty "Post-release breeding of translocated sharp-tailed grouse and an absence of artificial insemination effects," Wildlife Research 46(1), 12-24, (21 December 2018). https://doi.org/10.1071/WR18094
Received: 2 June 2018; Accepted: 23 August 2018; Published: 21 December 2018
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