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1 September 2004 A comparison of effects of radiotransmitter attachment techniques on captive white-winged doves
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Abstract

We experimentally evaluated alternative techniques of attaching radiotransmitters to captive white-winged doves (Zenaida asiatica) in Kingsville, Texas during 1998. Our evaluation consisted of monitoring physiological, pathological, and behavioral parameters in doves subjected to 6 radiotransmitter attachments (backpack harnesses, adhesive, subcutaneous implants, intracoelomic implants, subcutaneous surgeries without implantation, intracoelomic surgeries without implantation). We analyzed physiological parameters across 2 pretreatment and 4 post-treatment periods using a model-selection approach of mixed-effect models. Birds did not differ in physiological variables among treatment groups and a control. Time-activity budgets analyzed using nonparametric Friedman's tests did not differ in any activity category among treatment groups and a control. Subcutaneous implants were the most effective method of attachment based on retention rates, lack of mechanical difficulties associated with external attachment techniques, and minimum levels of pathology reported following necropsies.

Michael F. Small, Randy Rosales, John T. Baccus, Floyd W. Weckerly, David N. Phalen, and Jay A. Roberson "A comparison of effects of radiotransmitter attachment techniques on captive white-winged doves," Wildlife Society Bulletin 32(3), 627-637, (1 September 2004). https://doi.org/10.2193/0091-7648(2004)032[0627:ACOEOR]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 September 2004
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