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1 April 2005 Short-term landscape-scale effects of forest management on Peromyscus spp. mice within Missouri Ozark forests
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Abstract

We conducted a capture–recapture study within Ozark forests in south-central Missouri to evaluate the short-term (2–5 years after timber removal) effects of even-and uneven-aged forest management on Peromyscus spp. mice inhabiting north-and east-facing slopes of forest compartments. This study was part of the Missouri Ozark Forest Ecosystem Project, a 100-year experiment investigating landscape-scale impacts of forest management on forest flora and fauna. Changes between pretreatment (1994–1995) and post-treatment (1998–2001) numbers indicated that forest management had a short-term effect on mice. Even-aged management, and to a lesser extent uneven-aged management, appeared to dampen a natural decline in mouse abundance observed on no-harvest sites. Numbers on even-aged sites were greater than those on uneven-aged sites, which were greater than numbers on no-harvest sites following treatment. Both even-and uneven-aged forest management may positively affect Peromyscus spp. numbers, but this trend may change as additional trees are removed.

Debby K. Fantz and Rochelle B. Renken "Short-term landscape-scale effects of forest management on Peromyscus spp. mice within Missouri Ozark forests," Wildlife Society Bulletin 33(1), 293-301, (1 April 2005). https://doi.org/10.2193/0091-7648(2005)33[293:SLEOFM]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 April 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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