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1 October 2006 Will Mourning Dove Crippling Rates Increase With Nontoxic-Shot Regulations?
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Abstract

Increasing concerns about the exposure of mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) to spent lead shot may lead to a review of lead-shot restrictions. Policy reviews regarding current restrictions likely will involve debates about whether nontoxic-shot requirements will result in increased crippling loss of mourning doves. We evaluated waterfowl crippling rates in the United States prior to, during, and after implementation of nontoxic-shot regulations for waterfowl hunting. We use this information to make inferences about mourning dove crippling rates if nontoxic-shot regulations are enacted. We found differences in moving average crippling rates among the 3 treatment periods for ducks (F = 23.232, P < 0.001, n = 49). Prenontoxic-shot-period crippling rates were lower than 5-year phase-in period crippling rates (P = 0.043) but higher (P < 0.001) than nontoxic-shot-period crippling rates. Similarly, we observed differences in moving average crippling rates among the 3 treatment periods for geese (F = 9.385, P < 0.001, n = 49). Prenontoxic-shot- and 5-year-phase-in-period crippling rates were both greater than (P < 0.001) nontoxic-shot-period crippling rates but did not differ from one another (P = 0.299). Regardless of why the observed increases occurred in reported waterfowl crippling rates during the phase-in period, we believe the decline that followed full implementation of the nontoxic-shot regulation is of ultimate importance when considering the impacts of lead shot restrictions for mourning doves. We argue that long-term mourning dove crippling rates might not increase as evidenced from historical waterfowl data.

JOHN H. SCHULZ, PAUL I. PADDING, and JOSHUA J. MILLSPAUGH "Will Mourning Dove Crippling Rates Increase With Nontoxic-Shot Regulations?," Wildlife Society Bulletin 34(3), (1 October 2006). https://doi.org/10.2193/0091-7648(2006)34[861:WMDCRI]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 October 2006
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