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1 February 2007 Inbred Strains of Brine Shrimp Derived from Artemia franciscana: Lineage, RAPD Analysis, Life Span, Reproductive Traits and Mode, Adaptation, and Tolerance to Salinity Changes
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Abstract

Inbred strains of the brine shrimp were developed from dry dormant cysts of wild-type Artemia franciscana produced in the Great Salt Lake, U.S.A. The established strains were named GSL2, 4, and 7. They were raised in 2% natural sea salt solution at 28°C under a long-day condition, and fed on food sold for Artemia. Ovoviviparous offspring (free-swimming nauplii) in each brood derived from full sib (sister×brother) matings were used for succeeding generations. The ordinal number of the filial generation increased at a rate of ten generations per year. The number was over 60, and the lineage was recorded. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses of the inbred strains revealed the uniqueness, homogeneity, and genetic similarity among them. Their life span, the time required to become sexually mature, brood size, mode of reproduction, and adaptation and tolerance to salinity changes were investigated. The inbred strains usually released free-swimming nauplii rather than spawning encysted gastrulae (dormant cysts). On the other hand, the opposite results were obtained from wild-type Artemia under the same conditions. Both adults and nauplii of the inbred strains appeared to be less adaptive and less tolerant to salinity changes compared to those of the wild type. The established inbred strains should provide a wider and deeper scope for Artemia biology in particular, and the life sciences in general.

Fumiko Nambu, Shin Tanaka, and Ziro Nambu "Inbred Strains of Brine Shrimp Derived from Artemia franciscana: Lineage, RAPD Analysis, Life Span, Reproductive Traits and Mode, Adaptation, and Tolerance to Salinity Changes," Zoological Science 24(2), 159-171, (1 February 2007). https://doi.org/10.2108/zsj.24.159
Received: 28 November 2005; Accepted: 1 October 2006; Published: 1 February 2007
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