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1 September 2007 Righty Fish Are Hooked on the Right Side of Their Mouths – Observations from an Angling Experiment with Largemouth Bass, Micropterus salmoides
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Abstract

The development of muscles and bones in fish is laterally asymmetric (laterality). A “lefty” individual has a “C”-shaped body, with its left-side muscles more developed and the left side of its head facing forward. The body of a “righty” is the mirror-image. This laterality causes asymmetric interactions between individuals of different fish species, in that a righty or lefty fish consumes more lefty or righty fish, respectively. To investigate the coupling mechanisms between body asymmetry and predatory behavior, we conducted angling experiments with largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). We used the position of the fishhook set in the mouth to indicate the movement direction of the fish when it took the bait. Righty fish had more hooks set on the right side, whereas lefty fish had more on the left side, indicating that righty fish moved more to the left, and lefty fish moved more to the right, in successful catches. The relationship between the hooked position and movement direction was confirmed by video-image analysis of the angling.

Mifuyu Nakajima, Taiga Yodo, and Osamu Katano "Righty Fish Are Hooked on the Right Side of Their Mouths – Observations from an Angling Experiment with Largemouth Bass, Micropterus salmoides," Zoological Science 24(9), 855-859, (1 September 2007). https://doi.org/10.2108/zsj.24.855
Received: 23 July 2006; Accepted: 1 April 2007; Published: 1 September 2007
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