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1 August 2013 Mitochondrial DNA Transcription Levels During Spermatogenesis and Early Development in Doubly Uniparental Inheritance of the Mitochondrial DNA System of the Blue Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis
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Abstract

In some species of bivalve, there are two highly diverged mitochondrial genomes, one found in all individuals (F type) and the other normally in males only (M type). In Mytilus, a maternally-dependent sex ratio of the progeny has been reported. Some females almost exclusively produce daughters, while others produce a high proportion of sons. We previously reported that in M. galloprovincialis, M type mtDNA copy number may be maintained during spermatogenesis and the development of larvae of male-biased mothers to sustain the doubly uniparental inheritance system. In this study, we investigated transcription levels of M type mtDNA before and after fertilization to understand its function in the germ line. First, we quantified transcription levels of M type mtDNA in testicular cells dissected using laser-capture micro-dissection. The transcription levels of M type mtDNA were not significantly different between spermatogonia and spermatocytes versus spermatids and spermatozoa. Next, we examined differences in transcription levels of M type mtDNA between larvae from male-biased and female-biased mothers. The transcription levels of M type mtDNA significantly increased 24 and 48 h after fertilization in male-biased crosses. By contrast, transcription levels significantly decreased in female-biased crosses. These results suggest M type mtDNA may play a role in early germ line formation.

© 2013 Zoological Society of Japan
Natsumi Sano, Mayu Obata, and Akira Komaru "Mitochondrial DNA Transcription Levels During Spermatogenesis and Early Development in Doubly Uniparental Inheritance of the Mitochondrial DNA System of the Blue Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis," Zoological Science 30(8), (1 August 2013). https://doi.org/10.2108/zsj.30.675
Received: 22 January 2013; Accepted: 1 March 2013; Published: 1 August 2013
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