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1 December 2003 Another Quantitative Measure of Bat Species Activity and Sampling Intensity Considerations for the Design of Ultrasonic Monitoring Studies
Hugh G. Broders
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Abstract

To date, much of the research that has used ultrasonic detectors as a tool to address questions on the spatial and temporal distribution of bat species activity have been limited by the lack of a reliable and quantifiable unit of activity, and a poor understanding of sampling intensity required to accurately assess site-specific activity levels. Here it is demonstrated that file size (i.e., bytes) of Anabat-recorded echolocation sequences of the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) was highly correlated with the number of calls, and was easily determined, and therefore represents a reliable and quantifiable unit of echolocation activity. Additionally, it is shown that accurate quantification of a site-specific magnitude of M. lucifugus activity may not be possible, even with a sampling intensity of up to 20 nights. As a result, ultrasonic monitoring studies must be designed to minimize the effects of the high variability in bat species activity at a site among nights.

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© Museum and Institute of Zoology PAS
Hugh G. Broders "Another Quantitative Measure of Bat Species Activity and Sampling Intensity Considerations for the Design of Ultrasonic Monitoring Studies," Acta Chiropterologica 5(2), 235-241, (1 December 2003). https://doi.org/10.3161/001.005.0206
Received: 20 May 2003; Accepted: 4 July 2003; Published: 1 December 2003
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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KEYWORDS
Anabat
echolocation
index
Myotis lucifugus
research design
sampling intensity
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