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1 March 2008 Short-term pain for long-term gain: A hypothetical role for the mantle in coleoid cephalopod circulation
Alison J. King, Shelley A. Adamo
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Abstract

Mantle cavity pressures are frequently hypothesized to drive venous return in the high-output circulatory systems of coleoid cephalopods. However, studies using non-invasive, imaging ultrasound on resting cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis Linnaeus, 1758) conclude that mantle cavity pressures do not drive venous return. Interestingly, data from cuttlefish showing sustained mantle hyperinflation indicate instead that forces within the mantle's tissues could aid circulation. We hypothesize that alternating contractions of the radial and circular mantle muscles create a bellows-like effect on mantle capillaries. This effect could be propulsive during normal ventilation and jetting but could stop circulation when the cuttlefish is engaged in sustained mantle hyperinflation. Sustained mantle hyperinflation accompanies some behaviors, for example the Deimatic Display. The metabolic consequences of strangulated circulation might limit the duration of these behaviors.

Alison J. King and Shelley A. Adamo "Short-term pain for long-term gain: A hypothetical role for the mantle in coleoid cephalopod circulation," American Malacological Bulletin 24(1), 25-29, (1 March 2008). https://doi.org/10.4003/0740-2783-24.1.25
Received: 10 October 2006; Accepted: 1 June 2007; Published: 1 March 2008
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KEYWORDS
cardiovascular dynamics
mantle cavity pressure
peripheral circulation
Sepia officinalis
veins
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