Translator Disclaimer
1 August 2010 The Spatial Variation of Extreme Tooth Breakage in an Herbivore and Potential Age Structure Effects
Michael J. Clough, Cynthia S. Kendall MacKenzie, Hugh G. Broders
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Teeth are essential in mammals for the capture, handling and processing of food and self-defense. The rate of deterioration may affect longevity and indicate certain environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to characterize tooth conditions of moose (Alces alces) from multiple regions and to make inferences of possible causes of variation. An assessment of > 5500 moose incisors, found that the frequency of breakage and rate of decline in incisor integrity, with age, was much higher in Cape Breton and Newfoundland (breakage from 6% to 47%) than in New Brunswick, Ontario, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Yukon (breakage from 1% to 6%). Incisai degradation, among jurisdictions, differed significantly though population age structures did not appear different. The two jurisdictions most affected by incisai deterioration, Cape Breton and Newfoundland, are inhabited by genetically distinct subspecies, at higher densities than other regions; therefore, breakage may be linked to local environmental conditions.

© Finnish Zoological and Botanical Publishing Board 2010
Michael J. Clough, Cynthia S. Kendall MacKenzie, and Hugh G. Broders "The Spatial Variation of Extreme Tooth Breakage in an Herbivore and Potential Age Structure Effects," Annales Zoologici Fennici 47(4), 261-271, (1 August 2010). https://doi.org/10.5735/086.047.0404
Received: 16 March 2010; Accepted: 1 May 2010; Published: 1 August 2010
JOURNAL ARTICLE
11 PAGES


Share
SHARE
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top