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1 December 2013 A Modification of the Hair-Trapping Method for Surveillance of Problematic Bear Activity Close to a Farm — a Case Study from the Pasvik Valley in Norway
Alexander Kopatz, Snorre B. Hagen, Martin E. Smith, Leif E. Ollila, Paul E. Aspholm, Hans G. Eiken
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Abstract

Human—bear conflicts occur frequently in the Pasvik Valley, Norway. We used a variant of the hair-trapping method with higher densities of traps (2.5 × 2.5 km grid) to detect brown bears moving near human settlements and livestock. We distributed 20 hair traps for one month close to a farm with frequent observations of grazing bears. The study area consisted of one area close to the farm, and one adjacent area without settlements. We collected 85 hair samples and identified 13 different individuals by STR analysis. In the farm area, we detected 4 different males once, and a female that was detected in both areas. In comparison, nine bears (2 males and 7 females) were detected for more than one week in the area without settlements, suggesting lower roaming activity. Conclusively, hair trapping has the potential to survey bears at specific locations of importance to the wildlife management.

© Finnish Zoological and Botanical Publishing Board 2013
Alexander Kopatz, Snorre B. Hagen, Martin E. Smith, Leif E. Ollila, Paul E. Aspholm, and Hans G. Eiken "A Modification of the Hair-Trapping Method for Surveillance of Problematic Bear Activity Close to a Farm — a Case Study from the Pasvik Valley in Norway," Annales Zoologici Fennici 50(6), 327-332, (1 December 2013). https://doi.org/10.5735/086.050.0605
Received: 19 November 2013; Accepted: 13 May 2013; Published: 1 December 2013
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