Translator Disclaimer
11 September 2019 Approaches for Utilizing Insect Protein for Human Consumption: Effect of Enzymatic Hydrolysis on Protein Quality and Functionality
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Humans have practiced entomophagy for thousands of years; yet until recently, interest from Western countries has emerged toward using insects as alternative proteins to feed the growing world population. Research shows that western cultures are in favor of consuming familiar foods formulated with insect protein. This has led to the productions of insect-derived flours, primarily from crickets and mealworms, which are now available in North American and European markets. Studies have shown limited functional properties of these insect flours. Food scientists have long used controlled enzymatic protein hydrolysis as means for improving the functionality of different animal and plant proteins. Consequently, the production of insect protein hydrolysates seems like a logical approach to improve the functionality and nutritional quality of insect flours. This article provides an overview of the application of controlled enzymatic hydrolysis to produce insect protein hydrolysates with improved protein functionality, as well as opportunities and challenges faced during their use in food and feed formulations.

© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Andrea M. Liceaga "Approaches for Utilizing Insect Protein for Human Consumption: Effect of Enzymatic Hydrolysis on Protein Quality and Functionality," Annals of the Entomological Society of America 112(6), 529-532, (11 September 2019). https://doi.org/10.1093/aesa/saz010
Received: 6 December 2018; Accepted: 30 January 2019; Published: 11 September 2019
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top