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13 December 2013 Applying Lessons from the U.S. Botanical Capacity Assessment Project to Achieve 2020 Global Strategy for Plant Conservation Targets
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Abstract

Despite the fundamental role plant science plays in addressing global environmental issues, a recent survey of nearly 1600 members of the botanical community in the United States revealed a severe shortage in the nation's botanical capacity or resource capabilities that support the advancement of plant science. The survey and a subsequent published report detailed shortages of botanists at government agencies, a wave of upcoming retirements, and an alarming decline in botanical degree programs and course offerings at the nation's colleges and universities. Private sector organizations are filling gaps in botanical capacity created by declines in academic and government sectors. While this survey was carried out in the United States, its results are internationally relevant and applicable. These declines occur as the need for botanical capacity increases globally to address important plant conservation needs. Recognizing the critical situation facing the world's flora, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) adopted the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) to halt the continuing loss of plant diversity. Our results illustrate the necessity of working across public and private sectors to ensure that botanical capacity is valued, supported, and utilized to achieve all 16 targets of the GSPC by 2020.

Andrea T. Kramer, Barbara Zorn-Arnold, and Kayri Havens "Applying Lessons from the U.S. Botanical Capacity Assessment Project to Achieve 2020 Global Strategy for Plant Conservation Targets," Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 99(2), 172-179, (13 December 2013). https://doi.org/10.3417/2011110
Published: 13 December 2013
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