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1 January 1980 Heritability of Ecologically Important Traits in the Great Tit
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A. J. Van Noordwijk, J. H. Van Balen, and W. Scharloo "Heritability of Ecologically Important Traits in the Great Tit," Ardea 55(1–2), (1 January 1980). https://doi.org/10.5253/arde.v68.p193
Published: 1 January 1980
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