Translator Disclaimer
21 May 2019 Effects of temperature and exercise on metabolism of three species of Australian freshwater turtles: implications for responses to climate change
Bruce C. Chessman
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Oxygen consumption (ZO18062_E1a.gif) of Chelodina expansa, C. longicollis and Emydura macquarii (Pleurodira: Chelidae) was measured at rest and during induced exercise at 8, 13, 18, 22, 26, 30 and 34°C. Resting ZO18062_E1a.gif varied significantly among species, being lowest in C. expansa, which is the most sedentary of the three species in nature, and highest in E. macquarii, which is the most energetic, but active ZO18062_E1a.gif did not differ significantly among the three species overall. For both Chelodina species, resting ZO18062_E1a.gif was appreciably lower than expected from regression of ZO18062_E1a.gif on body mass for non-marine turtles globally, a result that reinforces previous evidence of low resting metabolism in Australian chelid turtles. Active ZO18062_E1a.gif of all three species at higher temperatures was similar to ZO18062_E1a.gif reported for active freshwater cryptodires. Resting ZO18062_E1a.gif of all three species increased similarly with temperature, but active ZO18062_E1a.gif and aerobic scope did not. In C. expansa and E. macquarii, active ZO18062_E1a.gif and aerobic scope increased over the full temperature range assessed but in C. longicollis these variables reached a plateau above 22°C. Projected increases in freshwater temperatures in south-eastern Australia as a result of global warming are likely to enhance activity, feeding and growth of the three species (subject to food availability), especially in cooler seasons for C. longicollis and warmer seasons for C. expansa and E. macquarii. However, other aspects of predicted climate change, especially increased drought, are likely to be detrimental.

© CSIRO 2018
Bruce C. Chessman "Effects of temperature and exercise on metabolism of three species of Australian freshwater turtles: implications for responses to climate change," Australian Journal of Zoology 66(5-6), 317-325, (21 May 2019). https://doi.org/10.1071/ZO18062
Received: 17 September 2018; Accepted: 6 May 2019; Published: 21 May 2019
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES


Share
SHARE
KEYWORDS
aerobic scope
Chelodina expansa
Chelodina longicollis
Emydura macquarii
oxygen consumption
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top