Translator Disclaimer
25 January 2013 Pathogenesis in Eurasian Tree Sparrows Inoculated with H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus and Experimental Virus Transmission from Tree Sparrows to Chickens
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Small wild birds that routinely enter poultry farms may be possible vectors of Asian lineage H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. In this study, we conducted experimental infections using wild-caught Eurasian tree sparrows (Passer montanus) to evaluate their possible epidemiological involvement in virus transmission. When tree sparrows were intranasally inoculated with the virus at a low or high dose, all sparrows excluding euthanatized birds died within 11 days after inoculation. Viruses were frequently isolated from the drinking water, oral swabs, and visceral organs of the sparrows. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the virus replicated strongly in the central nervous system, heart, and adrenal gland following primary infection in the upper respiratory tract and a probable subsequent viremic stage. In the contact infection study using virus-inoculated sparrows and untreated contact chickens, more than half of all chickens died from viral infection. In the virus transmission study in which chickens were given drinking water collected from virus-inoculated sparrows, mortality due to viral infection was observed in chickens. Our data suggest that Eurasian tree sparrows could be biological vectors of the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. In addition to frequent virus detection in the drinking water of sparrows, the results of the virus transmission study suggest that waterborne pathways could be important for viral transmission from tree sparrows to poultry.

Patogénesis en gorriones molineros inoculados con el virus de la influenza aviar altamente patógeno H5N1 y la transmisión viral experimental de los gorriones a los pollos.

Las aves silvestres pequeñas que habitualmente entran a las granjas avícolas pueden ser vectores posibles del linaje asiático del virus de la influenza aviar altamente patógeno H5N1. En este estudio, se realizaron infecciones experimentales utilizando gorriones molineros silvestres capturados (Passer montanus) para evaluar su posible implicación epidemiológica en la transmisión del virus. Cuando los gorriones se inocularon por vía intranasal con el virus a una dosis baja o alta, todos los gorriones, excluyendo las aves sacrificadas, murieron dentro de los 11 días después de la inoculación. El virus fue aislado con frecuencia del agua potable, de los hisopos orales y de los órganos viscerales de los gorriones. El análisis inmunohistoquímico reveló que el virus se replicó principalmente en el sistema nervioso central, corazón, y glándula suprarrenal, después de la infección primaria en el tracto respiratorio superior y de una probable etapa de viremia posterior. En el estudio de la infección por contacto utilizando gorriones inoculados con el virus y pollos contactos no tratados, más de la mitad de todos los pollos murieron de la infección viral. En el estudio de la transmisión del virus en pollos que recibieron agua potable obtenida de gorriones inoculados con el virus, se observó mortalidad debida a la infección viral en los pollos. Nuestros datos sugieren que los gorriones molineros podrían ser vectores biológicos del virus de la influenza aviar altamente patógeno H5N1. Además de la detección frecuente del virus en el agua de bebida de los gorriones, los resultados del estudio de transmisión sugieren que las vías de transmisión por el agua podrían ser importantes para la diseminación viral desde los gorriones a las aves comerciales.

American Association of Avian Pathologists
Yu Yamamoto, Kikuyasu Nakamura, Manabu Yamada, and Masaji Mase "Pathogenesis in Eurasian Tree Sparrows Inoculated with H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus and Experimental Virus Transmission from Tree Sparrows to Chickens," Avian Diseases 57(2), 205-213, (25 January 2013). https://doi.org/10.1637/10415-101012-Reg.1
Received: 28 December 2012; Accepted: 1 January 2013; Published: 25 January 2013
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top