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17 February 2022 Tissue Colonization and Egg and Environmental Contamination Associated with the Experimental Infection of Cage-Free Laying Hens with Salmonella Braenderup
Javier S. Garcia, Richard K. Gast, Jean Y. Guard, Darrin M. Karcher, Deana Jones
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Abstract

In 2018, a national recall of shell eggs in the United States occurred due to human illness caused by Salmonella Braenderup. Although previous studies have identified Salmonella Braenderup in laying hens and the production environment, little is known about the ability of this Salmonella serovar to infect laying hens and contaminate eggs. The objective of this study was to examine the invasiveness of Salmonella Braenderup in laying hens as well as its ability to persist in the production environment. Specific-pathogen-free laying hens (four trials; 72 hens/trial) were orally challenged with 107 colony-forming units of Salmonella Braenderup. On day 6 postinoculation, half of the challenged hens were euthanatized, and samples of ileocecal junction (sections above and below it, and portions of both ceca), liver, spleen, ovary, and oviduct tissues were collected and cultured for Salmonella Braenderup. Egg and environmental (nest box swaps and substrate (litter)) samples were collected days 7–20 postinoculation (Trials 1 and 2; excluding weekends) and days 7–27 postinoculation (Trials 3 and 4; excluding weekends) to detect Salmonella Braenderup. Recovery of Salmonella Braenderup was highest in ileocecal tissue samples (11.1%–33.3%; P < 0.05), with little to no recovery in other collected tissue samples. Salmonella Braenderup was detected in a small number of shell emulsions (0%–2.9%; P < 0.01) and recovered in Trial 1 at a high rate (92.5%; P < 0.0001) in the substrate composite samples; however, recovery of Salmonella Braenderup was low in the other egg and environmental samples. These trials indicate that Salmonella Braenderup is not an invasive Salmonella serovar for cage-free laying hens, especially when compared to serovars of concern to the egg industry. However, it may persist in the environment at low levels.

Javier S. Garcia, Richard K. Gast, Jean Y. Guard, Darrin M. Karcher, and Deana Jones "Tissue Colonization and Egg and Environmental Contamination Associated with the Experimental Infection of Cage-Free Laying Hens with Salmonella Braenderup," Avian Diseases 66(1), 74-78, (17 February 2022). https://doi.org/10.1637/21-00091
Received: 30 September 2021; Accepted: 7 December 2021; Published: 17 February 2022
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KEYWORDS
contamination
eggs
environment
layers
Salmonella Braenderup
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