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1 May 2004 The Primate Embryo Gene Expression Resource: A Novel Resource to Facilitate Rapid Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns in Non-Human Primate Oocytes and Preimplantation Stage Embryos
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Abstract

Detailed molecular studies of preimplantation stage development in a suitable nonhuman primate model organism have been inhibited due to the cost and scarcity of embryos. To circumvent these limitations, we have created a new resource for the research community, designated as the Primate Embryo Gene Expression Resource (PREGER). The PREGER sample collection currently contains over 160 informative samples of oocytes, obtained from various sized antral follicles, and embryos obtained through a variety of different protocols. The PREGER makes it possible to undertake quantitative gene-expression studies in rhesus monkey oocytes and embryos through simple and cost-effective hybridization-based methods. The PREGER also makes available other molecular tools to facilitate nonhuman primate embryology. We used PREGER here to compare the temporal expression patterns of five housekeeping mRNAs and three transcription factor mRNAs between mouse and rhesus monkey. We observed noticeable differences in temporal expression patterns between species for some mRNAs, but clear similarities for others. Our results also provide new information related to genome activation and the effects of embryo culture conditions on gene expression in primate embryos. These results provide one illustration of how the PREGER can be employed to obtain novel insight into primate embryogenesis.

Ping Zheng, Bela Patel, Malgorzata McMenamin, Suhas E. Reddy, Ann Marie Paprocki, R. Dee Schramm, and Keith E. Latham "The Primate Embryo Gene Expression Resource: A Novel Resource to Facilitate Rapid Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns in Non-Human Primate Oocytes and Preimplantation Stage Embryos," Biology of Reproduction 70(5), 1411-1418, (1 May 2004). https://doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.103.023788
Received: 1 October 2003; Accepted: 1 January 2004; Published: 1 May 2004
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