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12 May 2010 Rethinking the Relationship Between Hyperactivation and Chemotaxis in Mammalian Sperm
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Abstract

Hyperactivation, a motility pattern of mammalian sperm in the oviduct, is essential to fertilization. Hyperactivation helps sperm to swim effectively through oviductal mucus, to escape from the sperm reservoir, and to penetrate the cumulus matrix and zona pellucida of the oocyte. There is some evidence that mammalian sperm can undergo chemotaxis; however, the relationship of chemotaxis to hyperactivation is unknown. Ca2 signaling is involved in hyperactivation and implicated in chemotaxis as well. In vivo, sperm hyperactivate in the lower oviduct, far from the cumulus-oocyte complex and possibly beyond the influence of chemotactic gradients emanating from the oocyte or cumulus. Thus, sperm are likely to be hyperactivated before sensing chemotactic gradients. Chemotactic signals might modulate hyperactivation to direct sperm toward oocytes as they reach a region of influence. Ca2 -directed modulation of hyperactivation is a potential mechanism of this process.

Haixin Chang and Susan S. Suarez "Rethinking the Relationship Between Hyperactivation and Chemotaxis in Mammalian Sperm," Biology of Reproduction 83(4), 507-513, (12 May 2010). https://doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.109.083113
Received: 15 December 2009; Accepted: 1 May 2010; Published: 12 May 2010
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