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1 September 2011 Population Dynamics of Two Aquatic Salamanders, Siren intermedia and Amphiuma tridactylum in the Mississippi Delta
Justin Johnson, Eric Blackwell
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Abstract

Siren intermedia and Amphiuma tridactylum are aquatic salamanders that live in temporal ponds, swamps, sloughs, ditches, and sluggish streams. The salamanders' population dynamics, especially survivorship, and migration patterns are generally unknown in the Mississippi Delta. At Delta State University's Center for Science and Environment Education, five small ponds were used to develop a model to determine selected population parameters of S. intermedia and A. tridactylum. Modified minnow traps baited with bacon were used to capture the salamanders safely without disturbing the habitat. Upon capture, length (cm) and weight (g) were determined. Each individual was tagged by inserting a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT tag) into the muscular portion of the tail. They were then returned to the original pond of capture. The goal of this project was to determine the population size, survivorship, and migration patterns of S. intermedia and A. tridactylum. Fifty two S. intermedia and 29 A. tridactylum were captured from February 2008 through April 2010. Both species had small population sizes with large 95% confidence intervals. This model may be useful for wetland restoration and wildlife management in the Mississippi Delta.

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Justin Johnson and Eric Blackwell "Population Dynamics of Two Aquatic Salamanders, Siren intermedia and Amphiuma tridactylum in the Mississippi Delta," BIOS 82(3), 72-77, (1 September 2011). https://doi.org/10.1893/011.082.0304
Received: 12 November 2010; Accepted: 1 February 2011; Published: 1 September 2011
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