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1 September 2011 Securing a Future for China's Wild Plant Resources
Weiguo Sang, Keping Ma, Jan C. Axmacher
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Abstract

China harbors one of the most species-rich floras in the world. This plant diversity is currently severely threatened by high levels of habitat degradation and unsustainable resource extraction, the country's exceptionally fast economic growth, an uncontrolled increase in tourism, invasive species, and climate change. Furthermore, China's current system of protected areas is ineffective at conserving the country's plant resources, with low levels of enforcement and only a few small reserves located in both the most phytodiverse regions and in areas facing the highest anthropogenic pressure. Seven strategic steps are required in order to secure a future for China's wild plants, including surveys to establish current species distributions and threat levels, the creation of an effective protected-area system focused on quality rather than quantity, resettlement of parts of the scattered rural population, control of the illegal export trade and invasive species, and a streamlining of administrative responsibilities and capacity building in conservation.

© 2011 by American Institute of Biological Sciences. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions Web site at www.ucpressjournals.com/reprintinfo.asp.
Weiguo Sang, Keping Ma, and Jan C. Axmacher "Securing a Future for China's Wild Plant Resources," BioScience 61(9), 720-725, (1 September 2011). https://doi.org/10.1525/bio.2011.61.9.11
Published: 1 September 2011
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KEYWORDS
Anthropogenic threats
overexploitation
priority conflict
protected-area management
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