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1 December 2010 Spawning-Related Movements of Barred Sand Bass, Paralabrax nebulifer, in Southern California: Interpretations from Two Decades of Historical Tag and Recapture Data
E. T. Jarvis, C. Linardich, C. F. Valle
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Abstract

During the 1960s and 1990s, the California Department of Fish and Game tagged 8,634 barred sand bass in southern California, and 972 fish (11%) were recaptured. Tag returns suggest barred sand bass are transient aggregate spawners that form spawning aggregations consisting of both resident and migrant individuals. Spawning residency at a historic spawning location was estimated by the frequency of returns over time; most same-year returns (82%, n  =  141) were recaptured within a 7 to 35-day period. The maximum recapture distance was 92 km. The average (± SD) non-spawning season recapture distance from peak spawning season tagging locations was 13 ± 8 km, and movement was generally northward. A positive relationship existed between fish size (TL) and migration distance to non-spawning season recapture locations. Fish tagged at a presumed non-spawning season residence were primarily recaptured south of the tagging location during peak and late spawning season; the average migration distance was 17 ± 15 km. Recaptures in subsequent years showed a high degree of spawning (80%, n  =  135) and non-spawning (73%, n  =  11) site fidelity. This is the first documentation of the spawning-related movements of barred sand bass and will be important for informing management decisions regarding this popular sport fish.

E. T. Jarvis, C. Linardich, and C. F. Valle "Spawning-Related Movements of Barred Sand Bass, Paralabrax nebulifer, in Southern California: Interpretations from Two Decades of Historical Tag and Recapture Data," Bulletin, Southern California Academy of Sciences 109(3), 123-143, (1 December 2010). https://doi.org/10.3160/0005-2086-109.3.123
Published: 1 December 2010
JOURNAL ARTICLE
21 PAGES


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