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15 April 2020 Effect of various monochromatic light-emitting diode colours on the behaviour and welfare of broiler chickens
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Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of different monochromatic light-emitting diode colours on the behaviour and welfare of broiler chicks. A total of 750 one-day-old chicks were used and lighting was set up as follows: pure blue (PB, 440–450 nm), bright blue (460–470 nm), sky blue (480–490 nm), greenish blue (500–510 nm), and green (530–540), while fluorescent white (400–700 nm) was used as a control. Birds were placed into 30 independent light proof pens and each light treatment was replicated five times with 25 birds in each pen. Video was recorded and behaviour was evaluated twice per day and observed five consecutive days in a week. Broiler welfare was evaluated using the characteristics of gait score, tibia dyschondroplasia, tonic immobility duration, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio. In results, sitting, walking, and ground pecking behaviour were influenced by the light colour from 0 to 7 d. Extending the rearing period from 8 to 21 d resulted in increased sitting behaviour and decreased walking and pecking behaviour in chicks in the PB treatment (P < 0.05). When the growth period was extended further (22–42 d), sitting behaviour increased when chicks were exposed to PB light (P < 0.05). The effect of light colour did not significantly influence welfare of broiler chicks. Thus, the present results suggest that PB light colour decreased broiler chickens movement and thus increased duration of sitting behaviour. These results would be helpful to choose light colour for broiler producers.

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Shabiha Sultana, Md. Rakibul Hassan, Byung Soo Kim, and Kyeong Seon Ryu "Effect of various monochromatic light-emitting diode colours on the behaviour and welfare of broiler chickens," Canadian Journal of Animal Science 100(4), 615-623, (15 April 2020). https://doi.org/10.1139/cjas-2018-0242
Received: 5 December 2018; Accepted: 26 December 2019; Published: 15 April 2020
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