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11 May 2015 The relationship between the polymorphism of the porcine CAST gene and productive traits in pigs
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Abstract

Urbanski, P., Pierzchala, M., Terman, A., Kamyczek, M., Rózycki, M., Roszczyk, A. and Czarnik, U. 2015. The relationship between the polymorphism of the porcine CAST gene and productive traits in pigs. Can. J. Anim. Sci. 95: 361-367. The aim of the study was to characterize the polymorphism of the calpastatin gene identified with ApaLI, Hpy188I and PvuII restriction enzymes in two pig breeds and one line bred in Poland, and to evaluate the relationship between the CAST genotype and carcass traits. The analysis covered a total of 617 pigs of two breeds, Polish Landrace (185) and Polish Large White (216), and synthetic line L990 (216). All animals studied appeared to be monomorphic at two loci: CAST/ApaLI and CAST/Hpy188I, while three genotypes were observed at CAST/PvuII locus. Statistical analysis was carried out for each breed separately using the least square methods of the GLM procedure. The model included the effect of the CAST genotype, fixed effect of the RYR1 genotype and the effect of the sire. Because the RYR1 genotype could significantly modify the effect of other genes, the effect of the RYR1 genotype was included in the statistical model. The relationship between the polymorphism and several productive traits was identified in each of the study groups of pigs. Animals carrying the heterozygous genotype at this locus showed most extreme values for some of the traits tested. Our results suggest that the CAST /PvuII genotype might be utilized in the selection of valuable pig carcass traits, particularly weight and size of the loin.

Pawel Urbański, Mariusz Pierzchała, Arkadiusz Terman, Marian Kamyczek, Marian Różycki, Agnieszka Roszczyk, and Urszula Czarnik "The relationship between the polymorphism of the porcine CAST gene and productive traits in pigs," Canadian Journal of Animal Science 95(3), 361-367, (11 May 2015). https://doi.org/10.1139/CJAS-2014-186
Received: 19 December 2014; Accepted: 1 April 2015; Published: 11 May 2015
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