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24 March 2016 Can potential for dark cutting be predicted by phenotype? Relationship between sex, carcass characteristics, and the incidence of dark cutting beef
Shahid Mahmood, John A. Basarab, Walter T. Dixon, Heather L. Bruce
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Abstract

Recent research indicated that reduced carcass muscling and weight are associated with beef dark cutting. Existing data from a single farm (44 heifers, 136 steers) from three normal beef quality grades (Canada AAA, AA, A) and the dark cutting grade (Canada B4) (n = 35, 106, 28, and 11, respectively) were used to identify relationships between sex, live animal, and carcass characteristics and the incidence of dark cutting. Categorical modelling showed a trend (P = 0.106) for heifer carcasses to have a greater probability [11.36 ± 4.78% standard error of the mean (SEM)] of dark cutting than carcasses from steers (4.4 ± 1.76% SEM). Mixed model analysis of variance indicated dark cutting heifers weighed less than cattle from normal grades at weaning (P = 0.0229) and slaughter (P = 0.0295). Logistic regression revealed that the probability of each carcass grade occurring was influenced by dry matter intake (DMI) (P = 0.0034), and the probability of dark cutting was lowest (P = 0.0286) in cattle with carcasses greater than 300 kg. Results suggested that cattle at risk of dark cutting may be identified by weight, average daily gain (ADG), and feed intake.

Shahid Mahmood, John A. Basarab, Walter T. Dixon, and Heather L. Bruce "Can potential for dark cutting be predicted by phenotype? Relationship between sex, carcass characteristics, and the incidence of dark cutting beef," Canadian Journal of Animal Science 96(1), 19-31, (24 March 2016). https://doi.org/10.1139/cjas-2015-0099
Received: 27 May 2015; Accepted: 1 October 2015; Published: 24 March 2016
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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KEYWORDS
average daily gain
bæuf
beef
carcass weight
coupe sombre
dark cutting
dry matter intake
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