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1 September 2012 The effect of cultivar, seeding rate and applied nitrogen on Brassica carinata seed yield and quality in contrasting environments
X. Pan, C. D. Caldwell, K. C. Falk, R. Lada
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Abstract

Pan, X., Caldwell, C. D., Falk, K. C. and Lada, R. 2012. The effect of cultivar, seeding rate and applied nitrogen onBrassica carinataseed yield and quality in contrasting environments. Can. J. Plant Sci. 92: 961-971. The unremitting growth of oilseed demand makes it necessary to explore alternative oilseed crops to meet this requirement. This study evaluated the effects of genotype, seeding rate and nitrogen (N) supply on the seed yield and quality of oilseed Brassica carinata A. Braun in three contrasting environments (Truro, NS, Harrington, PE and Saskatoon, SK). Useful genetic variation in agronomic and seed quality characteristics was found among these 10 B. carinata genotypes and genotype selection requires location specific recommendation. Line 050488EM had consistently good yield in both Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, while line 070768EM displayed better yield stability across 2 yr in Saskatchewan. Because of the high degree of compensatory ability to low plant population, maximum seed yield of B. carinata can be achieved over the range from 34 to 114 plants m-2. No significant difference in oil and protein content of seed due to seeding rates was observed. The linear increase in seed and oil yield with increased N rate up to 150 kg ha-1 indicates that B. carinata is highly responsive to applied N. Increases in N supply resulted in a decrease in oil content and a corresponding increase in protein content in all experiments. In summary, the findings of this study provide convincing evidence of the agronomic adaptation of B. carinata to all three locations.

X. Pan, C. D. Caldwell, K. C. Falk, and R. Lada "The effect of cultivar, seeding rate and applied nitrogen on Brassica carinata seed yield and quality in contrasting environments," Canadian Journal of Plant Science 92(5), 961-971, (1 September 2012). https://doi.org/10.1139/CJPS2011-169
Received: 22 August 2011; Accepted: 24 April 2012; Published: 1 September 2012
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