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1 January 2012 Development and use of rapid reconnaissance soil inventories for reclamation of urban brownfields: A Vancouver, British Columbia, case study
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Abstract

Iverson, M. A., Holmes, E. P. and Bomke, A. A. 2012. Development and use of rapid reconnaissance soil inventories for reclamation of urban brownfields: A Vancouver, British Columbia case study. Can. J. Soil Sci. 92: 191-201. As a result of suburban growth and abandonment and relocation of industrial facilities, vacant lots are becoming common in most urban centers in North America. These neglected, derelict, and often contaminated brownfields are receiving attention as a public liability since they are not productive and detract from the environmental quality of urban centres. Soils at these urban sites have been negatively impacted by anthropogenic activities. A prerequisite to effective reclamation is knowledge about the soil conditions on these sites. Most urban areas do not have soil survey or soil inventory information. Soil physical factors such as compaction are common problems at sites and are difficult and expensive to modify. A soil inventory provides the initial information for remediation and reclamation strategies that incorporate inherent soil properties. A soil inventory was conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia, by interpreting and extrapolating surficial geologic and regional soil survey information. The resulting soil inventory is presented as a series of topographical cross sections through the city, and displays information to stakeholders by reference to cultural features including street addresses. The soil inventory is compiled into soil management groups for general descriptions of the soil units and for initial recommendation for reclamation strategies.

Melissa A. Iverson, Emma P. Holmes, and A. A. Bomke "Development and use of rapid reconnaissance soil inventories for reclamation of urban brownfields: A Vancouver, British Columbia, case study," Canadian Journal of Soil Science 92(1), 191-201, (1 January 2012). https://doi.org/10.1139/CJSS2010-029
Received: 12 November 2010; Accepted: 5 July 2011; Published: 1 January 2012
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