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17 September 2013 Anthroposol development from limestone quarry substrates
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Abstract

Cohen-Fernández, A. C., Naeth, M. A. and Wilkinson, S. R. 2013. Anthroposol development from limestone quarry substrates. Can. J. Soil Sci. 93: 555-566. Limestone quarry reclamation worldwide requires development of substrates or anthroposolic soils. The suitability of three limestone substrates (gray, gray brown, crushed) for revegetation was assessed in two greenhouse experiments. In the first experiment amended substrates (pulp mill sludge, two manures, hay, straw, wood shavings, capping with two soils) alone and in combination with fertilizer and elemental sulfur were evaluated. Amendment rates were assessed in a second experiment. Plant density and above- and below-ground biomass were used to determine substrate suitability. The three limestone substrates supported germination, emergence and establishment of five native grasses when amended. Addition of fertilizer yielded three times more above-ground biomass and two times more below-ground biomass compared with the control, despite reducing plant density. Sulfur application did not significantly affect plant variables. Capped topsoil, clean fill and incorporated pulp mill sludge yielded the highest above-and below-ground biomass and plant density. To a lesser extent manure compost favorably changed plant parameters, but hay and straw did not. High fertilizer and amendment rates yielded better results than medium and low rates; pulp mill sludge was the exception with no significant difference in plant performance between low and high rates. Suitable anthroposols for limestone quarry reclamation were achieved.

Anayansi C. Cohen-Fernández, M. Anne Naeth, and Sarah R. Wilkinson "Anthroposol development from limestone quarry substrates," Canadian Journal of Soil Science 93(5), 555-566, (17 September 2013). https://doi.org/10.1139/CJSS2012-120
Received: 1 November 2012; Accepted: 1 June 2013; Published: 17 September 2013
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