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1 February 2001 Movement and Reproductive Biology of Female Midget Faded Rattlesnakes, Crotalus viridis concolor, in Wyoming
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Abstract

We studied three populations of the midget faded rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis concolor) in Wyoming to obtain data on reproduction and movements of pregnant females. Pregnant females emerged from hibernation, moved a short distance to a rookery, then moved very little for the remainder of gestation. During this time, females were not observed to forage or mate. Offspring were born between 20 August and 18 September. Mean litter size was 4.7 and was significantly related to female snout–vent length (SVL). Mean offspring SVL = 193 mm, mean offspring mass = 8.0 g; neither was related to female SVL. Litter mass was significantly related to female SVL, suggesting females invest energy into more offspring as opposed to larger offspring. Females appear to reproduce every two to three years. Sex ratio was 1:1 for data collected in 1997 but was significantly female biased for data collected before 1995. These data are compared to those reported for other populations of this species.

The American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
Kyle G. Ashton and Tim M. Patton "Movement and Reproductive Biology of Female Midget Faded Rattlesnakes, Crotalus viridis concolor, in Wyoming," Copeia 2001(1), 229-234, (1 February 2001). https://doi.org/10.1643/0045-8511(2001)001[0229:MARBOF]2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 18 July 2000; Published: 1 February 2001
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