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1 December 2004 Huckleberry Abundance, Stand Conditions, and Use in Western Oregon: Evaluating the Role of Forest Management
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Abstract

Huckleberries are major components of the understory vegetation in coniferous Pacific Northwest forests of the United States. Vaccinium species also have a long history of human use. However, little research has been done to ascertain how they respond to common forest management practices. We used data obtained from old-growth, young thinned, and young unthinned Douglas-fir stands in western Oregon to evaluate how forest management could potentially influence species abundance and product supply. Our analysis focused on three species: Vaccinium ovatum, V. parvifolium, and V. membranaceum. Results were variable, but indicate that overstory stand conditions and forest management can affect huckleberry species abundance. However, to assess fully the effects of forest management on these species, studies specifically designed to target areas where people harvest these products are needed. Measuring relevant product attributes such as commercial productivity is also critical.

Becky K. Kerns, Susan J. Alexander, and John D. Bailey "Huckleberry Abundance, Stand Conditions, and Use in Western Oregon: Evaluating the Role of Forest Management," Economic Botany 58(4), 668-678, (1 December 2004). https://doi.org/10.1663/0013-0001(2004)058[0668:HASCAU]2.0.CO;2
Received: 10 October 2002; Accepted: 1 February 2003; Published: 1 December 2004
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