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1 November 2008 Discovery of Ochlerotatus japonicus japonicus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae) in Southern New Hampshire, U.S.A. and Its Subsequent Increase in Abundance in Used Tire Casings
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Abstract

Following the discovery of the introduced mosquito, Ochlerotatus japonicus in western New Hampshire in 2000, a series of twelve used tire casings in southeastern New Hampshire was sampled, beginning in 2001, to study the occurrence of O. japonicus and its abundance over a five year period. Prior to 2003, Ochlerotatus triseriatus, a native species, was the numerically dominant mosquito species found in older water-filled tire casings. By 2004, O. japonicus had replaced O. triseriatus as the dominant mosquito species in this habitat, and by 2006 comprised 83% of the 2 species collected from the tires. Ochlerotatus japonicus has two larval population peaks annually in southeastern New Hampshire during the breeding season: mid-April to mid-May in spring, and early August to mid-September in mid-to late summer. Eggs continue to hatch and some larvae are present until freezing (ice over) occurs, usually in late October to early November. Ochlerotatus triseriatus has a single larval population peak from early May to mid-June. Eggs cease to hatch by late July to mid-August.

John F. Burger and Harry Davis "Discovery of Ochlerotatus japonicus japonicus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae) in Southern New Hampshire, U.S.A. and Its Subsequent Increase in Abundance in Used Tire Casings," Entomological News 119(5), 439-444, (1 November 2008). https://doi.org/10.3157/0013-872X-119.5.439
Received: 25 July 2007; Accepted: 1 December 2007; Published: 1 November 2008
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