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1 August 2007 Mitochondrial Haplotypic Diversity of Pine Cone Beetles (Scolytinae: Conophthorus) Collected on Food Sources
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Abstract

Conophthorus Hopkins attack, oviposit, and feed in immature cones of many pine (Pinus) species. They are a serious pest of pine seed orchards and can destroy up to 100% of the cone crop. Beetles can plague orchards over many years because emerging beetles tend to attack cones of the same or a nearby tree. However, fluctuating pine cone production suggests that beetles may disperse from their natal tree stand to find second-year cones for oviposition. These dispersal behaviors may influence population level genetic diversity, that is, populations may exhibit low or high diversity. In this study, we assess the mitochondrial haplotypic diversity among 10 populations of Conophthorus representing four species. Furthermore, the haplotypic diversities are compared with published haplotypic diversities of other scolytine species to assess the influence of fluctuating food resources on Conophthorus haplotype diversity. Conophthorus haplotypic diversity ranged between 13 and 70%, which was similar to population level haplotypic diversities of other scolytines. The tendency of the emerging brood to reinfest the same tree has little influence on haplotype composition of populations and haplotype diversity is likely more influenced by beetles in search of pine cones.

Katrina L. Menard and Anthony I. Cognato "Mitochondrial Haplotypic Diversity of Pine Cone Beetles (Scolytinae: Conophthorus) Collected on Food Sources," Environmental Entomology 36(4), 962-966, (1 August 2007). https://doi.org/10.1603/0046-225X(2007)36[962:MHDOPC]2.0.CO;2
Received: 11 February 2007; Accepted: 9 April 2007; Published: 1 August 2007
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